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In connection with last month’s ruling from a Washington, D.C. district court reinstating the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission’s (“EEOC”) collection of employer pay data previously stayed by the Office of Management and Budget (“OMB”) (Component 2 of the revised EEO-1 form), as previously reported here, the EEOC announced on May 2, 2019 that it has opted to collect Component 2 data for 2017 in addition to 2018. On April 25, 2019, the district court ordered the EEOC to collect a second year of pay data from select employers, giving the EEOC until May 3, 2019 to advise whether it would collect 2017 or 2019 data.
Continue Reading EEOC Announces Decision to Collect 2017 Employee Pay Data, in Addition to 2018 Pay Data, by September 30, 2019

On April 25, 2019, a Washington, D.C. federal judge ruled that all employers with 100 or more employees and federal contractors with 50 or more employees have until September 30, 2019 to submit their 2018 pay data to the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (“EEOC”), reflecting how much the employers paid workers of different sexes, races and ethnicities last year. This data is to be submitted as Component 2 of the EEO-1 form, and will supplement the EEOC’s long-running collection of employers’ demographic data.
Continue Reading Employers Must Provide Pay Data to EEOC by September 30

On August 1, 2016, Massachusetts Governor Charles Barker signed the Act to Establish Pay Equity.  The Act, which makes several important changes to Massachusetts wage laws, will go into effect on July 1, 2018.
Continue Reading Massachusetts – The Latest Jurisdiction to Update Its Pay Equity Laws

In Dejesus v. HF Management Systems Services, LLC, No. 12-4565 (2d Cir. Aug. 5, 2013), the Second Circuit Court of Appeals affirmed the dismissal of plaintiff Ramona Dejesus’ (“Plaintiff”) Fair Labor Standards Act (“FLSA”) and New York Labor Law (“NYLL”) overtime claims, finding that Plaintiff’s complaint lacked the factual specificity necessary to plead an overtime violation. Dejesus is the most recent in a line of Second Circuit decisions, beginning with Lundy v. Catholic Health System of Long Island (previously covered here), and Nakahata v. New York-Presbyterian Healthcare System, Inc., dismissing overtime claims under the FLSA and NYLL where plaintiffs have failed to allege sufficient facts to support such claims.
Continue Reading Second Circuit Rules that a “Bare-Bones” Complaint Rephrasing the Text of the FLSA is Insufficient to State an Overtime Claim