Computer and Internet Use

As we previously reported here in March 2020, the implementation of remote work policies heightens the risk of misappropriation of trade secrets in remote work environments and could require businesses to take additional steps to ensure the security of their trade secrets and confidential information. In the last few years, the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”) has charged several individuals with insider trading after they misappropriated material, nonpublic information obtained as a result of their remote work environment.[1] Most recently, a man was charged with insider trading after misappropriating trade secrets he obtained by listening to his wife’s[2] business calls while the two worked from home.Continue Reading Lesson Learned: Man Charged with Insider Trading After Misappropriating Information from Wife’s Work-From-Home Calls

Beginning on March 12, 2024, a new social media privacy law for employees and job applicants goes into effect in New York. The new law will amend the New York Labor Law (the “NYLL”) to restrict most employers from accessing the personal social media accounts of employees and job applicants. The new restrictions were approved when Governor Kathy Hochul signed into law two bills, Assembly Bill 836 (A836) and Senate Bill 2518A (S2518A), on September 14, 2023.Continue Reading Safe for Work? New Social Media Privacy Law Affecting New York Employers Goes into Effect on March 12

On August 4, 2023, the New York legislature introduced Senate Bill 07623 (“S07623”), which would dramatically restrict employers’ ability to use both electronic monitoring and automated employment decision-making technology in the state. As currently written, S07623 would apply to all New York employers regardless of size, including an employer’s labor contractors. While S07623 is currently being reviewed by the Rules Committee and still must work its way through the legislative process, it is expected to pass in some form. Because S07623 would create significant new obligations and restrictions for New York employers, they should take note of its requirements and track its progress.Continue Reading Rage Against the Machine: New York Bill Would Dramatically Limit Employers’ Ability to Use Electronic Monitoring and Automated Employment Decision Tools