New Jersey Legislative Update

On February 6, 2023, New Jersey Governor Phil Murphy signed the Temporary Workers’ Bill of Rights, significantly expanding the rights and protections afforded to the 127,000 temporary workers in New Jersey. The new law, which will largely take effect on August 5, 2023, though certain provisions already took effect on May 7, 2023, sets new requirements for “temporary help service firms” that employ “temporary laborers” in a “designated classification placement.”Continue Reading New Jersey Significantly Expands Rights and Protections of Temporary Workers Through the Recently Enacted Temporary Workers’ Bill of Rights

On December 19, 2022, the New Jersey Legislature passed a bill that, if signed by Governor Phil Murphy, would amend the effective date of amendments to the Millville Dallas Airmotive Plant Job Loss Notification Act (“NJ WARN”) that were originally passed in January of 2020. Those amendments were previously paused as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, and under that pause would take effect 90 days after Governor Murphy’s Executive Order No. 103 expired. Because Executive Order No. 103 remains in effect, without any indication of when it may expire, the New Jersey Legislature passed this bill to set an effective date of such NJ WARN amendments.Continue Reading New Jersey Legislature Passes Bill to Set the Effective Date of Amendments to the New Jersey WARN Act

Following a nationwide trend, New Jersey recently joined a growing list of states seeking to limit the use of non-compete and non-solicitation agreements by employers.Continue Reading What Employers Need to Know About Newly Proposed Non-Compete Legislation in New Jersey

On April 14th New Jersey Governor Phil Murphy signed Senate Bill 2353 into law. The law delays the application date of the New Jersey WARN amendments passed earlier this year and removes mass layoffs due to COVID-19 from coverage under the statute.
Continue Reading New Jersey Gives Employers a Break on New WARN Requirements Due to COVID-19

As detailed previously here, the New Jersey Paid Sick Leave Act (the “Act”), goes into effect October 29, 2018. In general, the Act allows New Jersey employees to accrue one (1) hour of sick leave time per thirty (30) hours worked, and allows New Jersey employees to use earned sick leave time for: (i) diagnosis, care, treatment of, or recovery from the employee’s mental or physical illness, injury or other adverse health condition, or for the employee’s preventive medical care; (ii) time to aid or care for a family member in one of the situations described in (i); (iii) time needed due to an employee’s or family member’s status as a victim of domestic or sexual violence; (iv) closure of the workplace, school, or childcare facility issued by a public health authority due to a public health emergency; and (v) a school-related conference or meeting. A detailed summary of the Act’s other requirements can be found here.
Continue Reading New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development Issues Proposed Regulations For the New Jersey Sick Leave Act

Last month, the New Jersey State Senate introduced Senate Bill 3518 (the “Bill”), which, if passed, will severely restrict the use and enforceability of employee non-compete agreements in the state of New Jersey. Most significantly, the Bill would: (1) prohibit entering or enforcing non-compete agreements with certain groups of employees; (2) require employers to pay full wages, salary, and benefits to employees during their non-compete period: (3) prohibit applying an arbitration provision or other such restriction to non-compete provisions; and (4) allow employees a private right of action for any statutory violation. The passage of the Bill would be a significant departure from current New Jersey law which generally enforces non-compete agreements and other restrictive covenants provided that they are reasonable in scope, protect legitimate business interests, and are not unduly burdensome on the employee or against public policy.
Continue Reading New Jersey Proposes to Drastically Restrict the Use of Non-Compete Agreements